PRESENTATIONS
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LET THE FUR FLY

Wednesday, July 14, 2021, 7 - 8:30 pm

Organized as part of the Orillia Museum of Art and History Speaker Series
 

Let the Fur Fly! Past and Contemporary Histories of Fur, Fashion and Friction will feature two speakers taking opposing views of Canada’s trade in animal skins. It is sure to be a lively discussion. Jill Price, an interdisciplinary artist, curator, educator and scholar, will examine the fur trade from an imagined animal perspective. Jill is currently exhibiting at OMAH. Unfurled: Unsettling the Archive from a More-Than-Human Perspective draws out narratives based on animals hunted, trapped and exchanged as part of the trade networks of the North American fur trade. John Savage will address the fur trade from the viewpoint of his ancestors. John is a descendant of Orillia's first settler and renowned fur traders, Antoine Gaudaur. As an amateur historian, he worked with OMAH as a co-curator on the exhibit Mnjikaning: Mapping the Life of the Gaudaurs.


To attend, please Register online

Fort Henry overlooking Lake Ontario, Pho

Ban Righ Speaker Series

October, 2020


The UN/making of a PhD Thesis: When Research in a Research-Creation PhD Discourages Further Research or Creation in Academic Spheres and the Public Realm

Speculating on how to go about unmaking the colonial aesthetics and ecological sterility of lawns found at settler and militaristic historic sites such as Fort Henry, this paper explains how my comprehensive exam exploring the science of trees and climate change in conjunction with the political realities of decolonization, reparation theory and non-representational theory, produced a number of conceptual paradoxes, practical difficulties and calls to action for self-identified white settler artists to unmake themselves from pursuing ecological research, remediation and presentation in public and academic spheres.

 

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UAAC Conference 2020

October 15-17 octobre, 2020

Co-organized by SFU, UBC and the UAAC Board of Directors

When Research in a Research-Creation PhD Discourages Further Research or Creation in Academic Spheres and the Public RealmResearch-Creation Roundtable | A Current and Critical Evaluation of Ethics in Creative Methods and Scholarship, co-chaired by Lois Klassen and Stéfy McKnight.

Speculating on how to go about unmaking the colonial aesthetics and ecological sterility of lawns found at settler and militaristic historic sites such as Fort Henry, this paper explains how my comprehensive exam exploring the science of trees and climate change in conjunction with the political realities of decolonization, reparation theory and non-representational theory, produced a number of conceptual paradoxes, practical difficulties and calls to action for self-identified white settler artists to unmake themselves from pursuing ecological research, remediation and presentation in public and academic spheres.

Register online